The Yoga Garden Game

The Yoga Garden Game

The Yoga Garden Game

  • Parent’s Choice Award winning game, YogaKids style!
  • For ages 4 & Up!
  • A fun learning tool designed to help children play and learn yoga
  • A cooperative game where the objective is to plant a flower garden before night falls
  • As players move the bumblebee marker around the board, they learn classic yoga postures, as well as have the chance to invent their own!

Comes complete with the Yoga Garden Game board, bee-shaped marker, pie shaped night pieces, circular flower pieces, Yoga Garden pose cards, a die and rule book.

Designed by Jennifer Durand and illustrated by Catherine Rose Crowther.

List Price: $ 20.00

Price: $ 19.95

The Key Poses of Yoga: Scientific Keys, Volume II

The Key Poses of Yoga: Scientific Keys, Volume II

  • High Quality Lay-Flat Binding

This book offers a scientific approach to understanding the practice of hatha yoga. Through four-color, three-dimensional illustrations of major muscles, tendons, and ligaments, Ray Long describes the practice and benefits of hatha yoga. Specific anatomical and physiological descriptions highlight the agonist, antagonist, and synergist muscles that come into play with each pose. Volume II of the series illustrates the correct muscle use during key poses of hatha yoga. From beginners to experts,

List Price: $ 34.95

Price: $ 22.76


Category: Yoga Tips

6 Responses to “The Yoga Garden Game”

  1. 3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A great first game for kids!, August 30, 2006
    By 
    Deb Donofrio (Baltimore, Maryland) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: The Yoga Garden Game (Toy)

    This game is so great for many reasons. It teaches cooperation as everyone has to take turns and work together to plant the garden before the sun sets. It teaches directions; I sometimes go over clockwise and counter-clockwise with the kids before the game. It helps with imagination, you can make up your own poses. It helps with self esteem, everyone gets a chance to be the teacher by doing the pose first. There is counting as kids hold the pose, we all count. It teaches motor skills – moving around the board as well as throwing the die. It teaches simple, fun yoga poses so there is movement within the game. I think 6 players would be the maximum because little kids get bored if they have to wait too long for their turn. You can also stop in the middle of the game and practice other yoga poses then go back and finish the game. Namaste!

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  2. Patricia Muniosguren "mind the gap" July 9, 2013 at 12:19 pm
    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Finally – a board game without the bickering!, August 29, 2006
    By 
    Patricia Muniosguren “mind the gap” (San Mateo, CA United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: The Yoga Garden Game (Toy)

    I bought the Yoga Garden Game two years ago and I’ve used it sparingly in my children’s yoga classes, especially when only 2-3 kids show up.

    It was a real hit when my Montessori classroom did a unit on games and play around the world. The children automatically gravitated to it and loved it! I taught some children how to play it, and they picked up the rules perfectly. The older children would set the board up on thier own and show the others how to play the game. Not once did I see them fight over the peices or the rules. They really enjoyed it and I would recommend it in the classroom!

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  3. Susan Mcmahon "yogasusie" July 9, 2013 at 12:47 pm
    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Movement and teamwork what a great combination !, August 28, 2006
    By 
    Susan Mcmahon “yogasusie” (Parker, Co) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: The Yoga Garden Game (Toy)

    I play the YogaKids Garden Game on a weekly basis !

    The gameboard is beautiful and the aspects of teamwork and movement are a great combination !

    My children 6, 4 and 2 love playing and love when we pick up a Yoga card and all move into the pose together.

    They love trying to plant all the flowers before

    nightfall ! Working together and cheering each other on !

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  4. College Girl "College Girl" July 9, 2013 at 1:42 pm
    48 of 49 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Key Poses of Yoga, January 26, 2010
    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: The Key Poses of Yoga: Scientific Keys, Volume II (Paperback)

    This book is fantastic! Have both Vol I & II, and they are invaluable for anyone wanting to learn about yoga, being healthier, or any nursing or med, or physical therapy student.
    The book shows which muscles are involved in each yoga move – the ones working, being stretched, or supporting the body weight. For anyone in medicine, this also breaks down movements into steps and illustrates why the patient is in pain with that movement. For anyone in physical therapy, is illustrates why you need to do that excerise & shows how it will help you.
    As a student in a yoga teacher training class, this helps me learn how to do the poses correctly and which muscles are working with each pose and how to avoid stressing injuried body parts. Fantastic reading and a great resource!

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  5. Karen B. Keyser "Beth K" July 9, 2013 at 2:42 pm
    36 of 38 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Excellent Text and Illustrations, May 8, 2008
    By 
    Karen B. Keyser “Beth K” (Butler, MD) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    The book’s design of using separate Theory and Practice sections has given me much more insight into how the mind and body work together when practicing Yoga. The author has turned an extremely detailed brain/anatomy lesson into something you really want to keep reading and explore further. The text combined with the illustrations in the Practice section help to tie it all together and get you towards the fullest extension of the pose while gaining knowledge of what is really working in your body at that time. Some mention and great illustration of the deep fibrous tissue are a plus. I would have liked more detail on that aspect but most books don’t even address it. All around great guide, you will use it often.

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  6. 30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Muscles in perspective, April 13, 2009
    By 
    Andrea S (Bayside, NY United States) –

    As a massage therapist and a yoga instructor, I was delighted to discover “The Key Poses of Hatha Yoga,” along with its partner “The Key Muscles of Hatha Yoga.” In “Key Poses” several representative yoga poses are described, detailing which muscles are contracting, which are being stretched, and how it affects the limbs and skeletal structure. What makes this book unique, however, are the jaw-dropping illustrations color-coding the contracting muscles in shades of blue and the stretching muscles in red and pink. Not only are they beautiful, but you can clearly see how the muscles balance and interact. These illustrations offer a “right brain approach” to understanding the poses, and serve as a guide for moving deeper into the poses. The practitioner then seeks to activate blue muscles and relax red ones, with the text explaining the actions.

    The book also offers a clear explanation of the mechanics of stretching, utilizing the muscle spindle, Golgi tendon organ, and reciprocal inhibition in a practical way to attain deeper stretches in the yoga practice. Although not a beginner’s “how to” book, it will deepen the understanding of the intermediate and advanced students with an interest in specific muscle actions. Overall, it is an auspicious pairing of western muscle physiology with eastern mind/body medicine.

    My only complaint about these books is the proofreading. I have found numerous errors of the technical sort (misplaced quote marks, etc.) and a few fairly important ones (mislabeled diagram, and the misspelling of “rectus abdominis” throughout). In addition, I would have preferred the Sanskrit rendering of the asana names to allow the reader to pronounce them correctly: “shirshasana” rather than “sirsasana” since they opted not to use the written diacritical marks (quite a few misspellings here too.) But, if you are not particular about such things, I can highly recommend this book as a useful tool, a fabulous reference, and overall eye candy for those interested in either yoga or muscle anatomy–a splendid addition to either your yoga or myology collections.

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