P90X2: The Next P90X DVD Series Base Kit

P90X2: The Next P90X DVD Series Base Kit

P90X2: The Next P90X DVD Series Base Kit

  • P90X2 continues your progress after P90X® with cutting-edge training based on powerful new sports science.
  • 12 new breakthrough workouts that include more emphasis on your core, athletic function, balance, and agility.
  • Includes a comprehensive, customizable nutrition plan with vegan and grain-free options.
  • From the makers of P90X–the #1 extreme fitness program in the world.
  • Personal trainer Tony Horton delivers the workouts with his unique blend of motivation and humor.

The result of two years of R&D conducted by a team of the most qualified experts in fitness, P90X2 includes training so cutting edge, so outrageously effective, you’ll be blown away by your visible results and your performance. While P90X is based on Muscle ConfusionTM-to break normal 30-day training plateaus so you get results fast-P90X2 ups the ante with a training technique developed by professional sports trainers for world class results: P.A.P., or Post-Activation Potentiation. With P90X2,

List Price: $ 139.80

Price: $ 120.00


Category: Yoga Tips

3 Responses to “P90X2: The Next P90X DVD Series Base Kit”

  1. 328 of 342 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A True Evolution in Home Fitness. . . But Not as Accessible as the 1st Series, Won’t Appeal to Everyone (Even Though It Should!), December 15, 2011
    By 
    Garvinstomp (Chicago or LA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    This review is from: P90X2: The Next P90X DVD Series Base Kit (Sports)

    New update at the bottom as my first round comes to a close.

    SHORT REVIEW: It’s absolutely incredible. It’ll challenge the heck out of you. You should only do this if you’re already in excellent shape or if you’ve completed P90X (which means you’re in excellent shape). Beginners should stick with the first system. The new series, while not as accessible to the masses as the original due to the exotic moves and the plethora of extra gear required to maximize the effectiveness, is truly the most elite home fitness series I’ve ever tried (and still way cheaper than gym memberships and Bowflex machines). Yes, it’s everything it was hyped to be (and probably more). You’ll pretty much be able to don a cape and fight crime when this is all over.

    LONG REVIEW: If you’ve read my review of P90X, you know that while I love the system, I’ve never been a “fanboy”. I’m not a coach or involved with Beachbody in any way. I’ve never purchased any supplements or shakes. And the only piece of equipment I’ve ever purchased from them are the Power Stand push-up bars (because they really are the best out there). I’ve used P90X and Tony’s 1-on-1’s because they really have worked for me and allowed me to get great results a) at home b) on a budget c) during a time crunch and d) while I’m traveling.

    I struggled when trying to give a star rating to P90X2, though. The reason there was a bit of hesitation on my part stems from the fact that this series, while absolutely delivering the goods on the workout front, moves away from P90X in terms of the complexity. With the original series, the big draw was that you could work hard with very little gear and get in crazy good shape. Part of the allure was the “just some dumbbells and a pull-up bar” mantra that permeated the set. And with P90X, that was largely true. With just those two pieces of gear you could get over 90% effectiveness in all of the exercises. But with P90X2, that’s just not the case.

    Sure, in the new series there are plenty of options for those people with minimal equipment, but the difference between doing standard push-ups versus doing them balanced on four medicine balls is night and day. If you want to get the most out of P90X2 here’s what additional gear (on top of what you had for P90X) you’ll want to pick-up: Stability Ball, Power Stand push-up bars P90X PowerStands Push-Up Stands(no, the regular little ones will not cut the mustard here due to the amount of movement), foam roller, plyo platform, 4-8 medicine balls, some floor tape, and a stick for stretching and core (a broomstick or bat works just fine). Fortunately, I already had a good amount of the equipment needed, but it’s still an investment as plyo platforms aren’t cheap (they say you can use a sturdy chair, but that better be one REALLY STURDY chair).

    So yes, at first I struggled looking at my workout space now populated by a bunch of new gear. Gone was the Spartan simplicity of “The X”. But all of that thought was just academic until the workouts began. And that is where the 5-star rating comes in. These workouts truly are the next level, delivering on their promise of being an evolution, as opposed to a sequel.

    Before I jump into doing P90X2 (as I’ve only had the system for a little more than a week), I decided that I would do each workout individually so as to get a feel for what I was dealing with and make any adjustments to my space or equipment needs beforehand (and be able to review the set, of course). I very quickly came to realize that all this extra gear wasn’t just some sort of gimmick, it really was challenging me, pushing me to go to places I’ve not been in a workout. While the options without the equipment will certainly push a person and increase their fitness, I’d have to estimate that you’re only 60-70% effective, at best. It’s important to note that Beachbody didn’t promise that this would be as simple or as streamlined as the first series. They didn’t promise that there wouldn’t be more equipment involved. That was just an assumption on my part. What they promised was that the new system would evolve the old system, using new science and technology to take super fit people and put them into and elite type of shape. And it certainly seems to live up to that promise.

    First, let’s discuss the structure of the program. For those familiar with the original, there are a few changes. In the original series you worked out 6 days per week, doing the same routine for 3 weeks. After that there would be a recovery week where the 6 workouts were lower impact and focused on stretching, core, and recovery. In P90X2, the 3 week period is now a bit more fluid, letting the individual do anywhere from 3-6 weeks of the same workouts before heading into a recovery week. And…

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  2. 111 of 117 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Big guy getting slender, getting muscular, feeling better!, December 28, 2011
    By 
    Storylover (Philadelphia, PA USA) –
    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)
      
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    This review is from: P90X2: The Next P90X DVD Series Base Kit (Sports)

    I took a good look at myself about a year ago, and didn’t like what I saw. I was embarrassed to wear most of my clothes; taking my shirt off at the beach was not going to happen–period. Heck, I could barely look at myself in the bathroom mirror. I had no neck. My belly was sticking out and sagging over. My fat fat pants were too tight. I couldn’t find shirts that I could close the collar to wear a tie.

    I had manboobs.

    I hid myself behind big sweaters and oversized sweats. I am 5’6″ and weighed about 225 lbs. I was exhausted going up a single flight of stairs to my bedroom. I have 3 active little boys, and they wanted to wrestle with papa. That was simply not going to happen either. Something had to give.

    So I did the craziest thing I could have–I did Insanity, and loved it. I followed that with Insanity: The Asylum, and then P90X x 2 rounds. I lost 45 pounds, and gained a lot of muscle. I’m still a big guy. I need to loose about 25 pounds more, honestly, and I have a long way to go to get into shirt removal at the beach shape–but I have my self respect back. And I have learned some important lessons.

    1. I got fit when I took responsibility for my own fitness. I had a lot of good excuses–full time job, wife with full time job, no gym very close, don’t like to diet. Finally, I just decided what was most important to me–being able to be a good dad for my kids. I decided that everything else just had to fall in line. I was a couch lump but I secretly knew that my pre-marriage slender self was still there somewhere, so I decided not to try, but to succeed. No matter what. I made this decision with my heart and my head, and so can you–even if you are really big, or really scared, or really uninterested in exercising. You just have to decide and commit. If you do that, you will succeed.

    2. No matter how much the exercise hurts, it feels better than feeling horrible all the time, barely being able to breathe, being too big to play with your kids or climb the stairs. Exercise hurts much less than that.

    3. I know now that there is nothing I can’t do if I put my mind to it and don’t let myself have any excuses. I write down what I eat. I announced to my friends and family what I am doing and gave them full permission to encourage and ask me impolite questions about my exercises. I put it out there on facebook that I was starting to exercise, and I posted for accountability every day. I found a facebook group of exercisers and joined them. (if you need one, let me know, I’ll hook you up). I didn’t let food rule my life–I decided to eat what I always knew I should, and soon it seemed natural. Online Weight watchers helped me, but there are a number of good programs available, and the p90x2 diet is just solid, sensible nutrition.

    4. I didn’t let myself be scared off because someone told me p90x was “extreme”. Half measures hadn’t worked for me. I needed something that I knew was bigger, harder, better than me. And when I began, I wanted to cry. I had to scale everything down when I started, but I did my absolute best, and kept trying to make it better. And guess what? I did it, just a little better each time. I probably looked like a white whale flopping around on the floor, but I did it. And I am so happy!

    So what does this have to do with p90x2? I need a new challenge. I’m getting a little bored of p90x after 6 months of doing it daily, and boredom is the enemy of fitness for me. I know that telling myself that I’ll join a gym is a recipe for failure for me. I’ll never go. I love my dvd’s that let me go down to the privacy of my basement and get totally nuts without an audience except my family. So I need a new program that will push me. I need something to pit myself against as a challenge. I need to recommit to being healthy for my boys and my wife and myself.

    I got p90x2 about 2 weeks before Christmas. I’ve been doing it and here is my report.

    1. Is it harder than p90x?
    Yes and no. It is different–the moves are now focused on including balance and core work while doing resistance. This is a new way to think about resistance workouts, honestly, and it is huge. It is making me work hard in ways that I have never worked before, and the more I do exercise this way, the more I enjoy it.

    2. Can I do it?
    Yes, you can. If you are willing to give everything your best shot, then you can…

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  3. 258 of 280 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Good and Bad, December 22, 2011
    By 
    G.W.

    This review is from: P90X2: The Next P90X DVD Series Base Kit (Sports)

    Having worked through P90X and P90X+, P90X2 falls somewhere in between. There are some great points about P90X2 and some very bad–even dangerous–points about P90X2. I loved P90X and still think it’s the best exercise program on the market. P90X+ was just a marketing program designed to sell more gear and videos, and it quickly died. Like P90X+, P90X2 is very much a marketing program designed to sell a lot of overpriced fitness equipment. In spite of what they advertise about the hotel workout, you cannot do P90X2 without a lot of gear. You need 3-4 medicine balls of various sizes (actually a couple of large ones, for balance purposes, as well as smaller ones for some lifting), and they need to be firm enough to support your weight. So the cheapie plastic ones won’t do. Practically every exercise uses a stability ball, so that’s a must have. You also need a lot of dumbbells. Bands are problematic, since it’s hard to use a band on a stability ball. I’m not convinced the foam roller does a lick of good, so you can take it or leave it based on your own experience.

    I’ve just started this program, so I will probably update as I work through various videos.

    PROS
    The pros are:
    1. It’s something new. You can only do P90X so long before you get bored with it and lose the challenge. P90X2 brings a new challenge.
    2. The X2 Core and Plyocide exercises are fun and different and really emphasize the core. I can see how these are especially beneficial to athletes who are trying to improve explosiveness, performance, flexibility, and core strength. For those of us who just want to look good, these routines are really going to do a lot for your waist, hips, lower back, and abs.

    CONS
    1. The traditional resistance programs (i.e., X2 Total Body, X2 Ab Ripper, etc.) really provide little resistance. They constantly combine basic moves with Warrior 3 or some other balance move. Like any mutlitasking, instead of gettng twice the benefit, you end up doing two things poorly. The balance moves keep you from maxing out the resistance moves, and trying to do the resistance lowers the effectiveness of the balance moves. Also, many of these exercises are outright dangerous and tweak joints and tissues in inappropriate ways. My intent is to swap these routines out with an equivalent P90X routine. These routines are significantly inferior to the P90X routines and won’t give you the same level of intensity.
    2. The X2 Ab Ripper is useless. Worse, it’s dangerous and extremely bad for your lower back. Don’t do this routine. Replace it with Ab Ripper X, if you have it.

    The net of it is that P90X was so popular because it was an intense workout that used simple exercises that required little equipment. P90X2 uses incredibly complex–and sometimes dangerous–exercises that require a great deal of equipment. Many of the exercises seem created solely for the purpose of using the equipment. Consequently, they place odd streses on joints and ligaments and increase the possibility of injury.

    If you’re a P90Xer, like me, I’m sure you’ll buy this product and try it, because you’re ready for something new. I would encourage you, though, to consider modifying it as I will–substituting Chest, Shoulders, Tris for X2 Total Body or Legs and Back for Base and Back, as an example. You’ll put less strain on your body and do a much better job of building strength in those areas.

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